The official bulletin of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 1982-present.

Art Documentation is the official bulletin of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 1982-present. It includes articles and information relevant to art librarianship and visual resources curatorship. Since 1996, it has been published twice yearly (spring and fall). The subscription to Art Documentation is included as part of membership in ARLIS/NA. Authors who wish to publish their work in Art Documentation should consult the Contributor Guidelines.

Art Documentation is published for ARLIS/NA by University of Chicago Press, which supports green open access for all of its journals. Authors may self-archive their own articles and make them freely available through institutional repositories after a one-year embargo. Authors may also post their articles in their published form on their personal or departmental web pages or personal social media pages, use the article in teaching or research presentations, provide single copies in print or electronic form to their colleagues, or republish the article in a subsequent work, subject to giving proper credit to the original publication of the article in Art Documentation, including reproducing the exact copyright notice as it appears in the journal.

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Tables of Contents

To search Art Documentation contents 1982-present, go to the journal home page.

 

2018: Volume 37

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2017: Volume 36

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2016: Volume 35

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2015: Volume 34

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2014: Volume 33

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2013: Volume 32

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2012: Volume 31

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2011: Volume 30

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2010: Volume 29

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2009: Volume 28

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2008: Volume 27

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

 

Current Issue Abstracts

Art Documentation vol. 37, no. 2 (Fall 2018)

Panel Problems: Issues and Opportunities for Webcomics Archives
Megan Halsband and Stephanie Grimm

Abstract—Webcomics are an increasingly popular format for comic artists and creators that should be collected by libraries and archives to both complement and expand existing comics and artist collections. The unique nature of webcomics production requires that libraries and archives consider the ways in which these materials intersect with current collections. This article presents both the opportunities and challenges of collecting webcomics materials, situating the argument within the larger context of web archiving and evolving collection practices. 

Der Berliner Kunstmarkt: An Analysis of the Berlin Art Market, 1930–1945
Caroline Frank and Jason Kaplan

Abstract—The authors investigate Berliln’s art auction market as it developed between 1930 and 1945. By analyzing Berlin’s auction data from the Getty Research Institute’s recently published database of German auction sales catalogs dating from 1930 to 1945, this article explores the Third Reich’s influence on the Berlin fine art auction market. The analysis is separated into two main categories: the overall market and the auction houses, in particular a close examination of the auction houses Graupe and Lange. Key findings include the inverse relationship between median selling price and the number of paintings sold over several years, indicating that paintings sold in Berlin during this time functioned more like normal goods rather than luxury items; the interconnected relationship between the ownership and operations of many auction houses, including Graupe’s transition to Lange after fleeing from anti Semitism in Berlin; and the evidence that stolen artwork was auctioned for sale on several occasions, with most of the proceeds benefitting Hitler’s Nazi regime.  

Revealing Invisible Collections: Implementing the ARLIS/NA Artists’ Books Thesaurus to Provide Online Access
Sarah Carter and Alex O’Keefe 

Abstract—The University of Louisville’s Margaret M. Bridwell Art Library is one of the first institutions to employ the Art Libraries Society of North America’s Artists’ Books Thesaurus (ARLIS/NA ABT) vocabulary to describe images of artists’ books within a CONTENTdm collection. Over the course of three months, the art librarians and graduate intern worked with multiple stakeholders to build a digital collection designed to reveal unique structures for patron browsing and searching. This article describes the implementation of the project, detailing the process of creating an online artists’ books index from inception to the initial upload of final records. Suggestions are offered for future engagement with the ARLIS/NA Artists’ Books Thesaurus for digital access to artists’ books.  

Placing Research on Their Map: Curriculum Mapping as a Collaboration Tool for an Architecture Branch Library
Bonnie Reed, Hillary B. Veeder, Sara Schumacher, and Brian C.R. Zugay

Abstract—This article presents the authors’ efforts to collaborate with faculty in a curriculum mapping program that enables shared understanding of curricular objectives and goals. By collaborating and coordinating with faculty for embedded library sessions or modules, this program can be used to strengthen information and research competencies at the appropriate academic levels throughout the degree program. Curriculum mapping helps communicate opportunities to bring together teaching and learning from the lecture hall and studio to the library where students can be introduced to pertinent resources and information that will support their course work and build their understanding of research. 

Thinking Outside the Search Box: Finding New Possibilities for Discovery and Access at the Canadian Centre for Architecture
Mar González Palacios

Abstract—The author explores how the redesign of the Canadian Centre for Architecture website and its custom search tool fit within the vision of the institution by blurring the line between what the CCA produces and collects. 

The article describes the challenges of working with data from different sources and different standards, including library, archives, and non-collection resources, as well as the issues still to be resolved and future plans. Working with staff outside the library and archives can push boundaries that allow information professionals to reconsider their understanding of collection discovery and access. 

Through the Conservator’s Lens: Developing a User-Centered Classification Scheme for an Art Conservation Library
Traci E. Timmons and Cindy Wilson 

Abstract—Discovering that a traditional classification scheme was not working for a departmental branch library, Seattle Art Museum research library staff embarked on a multi-year project to create a special-subject classification system with a special class scheme. Three key areas—user-specific taxonomy, cataloging and classification expertise of the library staff, and the department’s particular information-seeking behaviors—were key in the development of a successful scheme. This article describes the process by which the new classification scheme was developed, discusses its challenges and successes, and emphasizes how the library staff and departmental branch users are committed to the scheme’s continuous review and expansion.

One Hundred Years of History at the Ricker Library of Architecture and Art
Melanie E. Emerson

Abstract—Nathan C. Ricker (1843–1924) was the first person in the United States to receive a degree in architecture in 1873. After earning his degree at the University of Illinois, Ricker went on to become a prominent figure in architecture education—and more specifically at the University of Illinois School of Architecture. He was instrumental in building the early library collection that allowed students in the Midwest to study famous examples of architecture. Upon Ricker’s retirement in 1917, the university honored him by naming the library after him. To mark the 100-year naming anniversary, the author examines the history of the library and its place within the history of architecture education. 

Teaching Research Outside the Classroom: A Case Study and Assessment
Audrey Powers

Abstract—Teaching students the research process is challenging in a one-shot library instruction session, but what can be done if even that opportunity does not exist? By creating a variety of digital modules and activities intended to instruct students on research methods and how to locate credible library sources in art history, the librarian for the College of The Arts (CoTA) at the University of South Florida developed a methodology to instruct over 200 students enrolled each semester in the History of Visual Arts I and History of Visual Arts II classes. This case study provides details about the learning modules and activities that were created, the assessment process and results, and the ongoing library instructional plan. Working in close collaboration with the art history professor and the instructional technologist/blended librarian over several academic years, the librarian for CoTA transitioned from a face-to-face instructional format to an online format that included the development of a course guide, quizzes, and instructional modules embedded in the course management system. 

Making the Unseen Visible: The RISD Acme Video Collection
Marc Calhoun

Abstract—Using lessons learned from acquiring, processing, and cataloging an extensive DVD and video collection, the author describes how the Rhode Island School of Design Library merged a large curated collection into its own holdings. The collection is analyzed in relation to the growing prevalence of streaming media versus physical access. The article also examines one approach—Tumblr—for keeping track of a collection that goes largely unseen.