The official bulletin of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 1982-present.

Art Documentation is the official bulletin of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 1982-present. It includes articles and information relevant to art librarianship and visual resources curatorship. Since 1996, it has been published twice yearly (spring and fall). The subscription to Art Documentation is included as part of membership in ARLIS/NA. Authors who wish to publish their work in Art Documentation should consult the Contributor Guidelines.

Art Documentation is published for ARLIS/NA by University of Chicago Press, which supports green open access for all of its journals. Authors may self-archive their own articles and make them freely available through institutional repositories after a one-year embargo. Authors may also post their articles in their published form on their personal or departmental web pages or personal social media pages, use the article in teaching or research presentations, provide single copies in print or electronic form to their colleagues, or republish the article in a subsequent work, subject to giving proper credit to the original publication of the article in Art Documentation, including reproducing the exact copyright notice as it appears in the journal.

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Tables of Contents

To search Art Documentation contents 1982-present, go to the journal home page.

2019: Volume 38

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2018: Volume 37

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2017: Volume 36

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2016: Volume 35

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2015: Volume 34

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2014: Volume 33

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2013: Volume 32

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2012: Volume 31

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2011: Volume 30

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2010: Volume 29

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2009: Volume 28

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2008: Volume 27

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

 

Current Issue Abstracts

Art Documentation vol. 38, no. 2 (Fall 2019)

Teaching Art Librarianship in Critical Praxis: Feminist Pedagogy in the Online LIS classroom
Emilee Mathews

Abstract—Art librarianship education traditionally exposes students to specialized knowledge of resources, users, and issues unique to the profession, providing a strong foundation for career success. Yet education comprises not only what subjects are covered, but how the subject is taught, and why. This article describes an online art librarianship course designed with feminist and critical pedagogy principles guiding content, structure, and communication, taught through Indiana University in 2018. The author discusses and evaluates course design and pedagogy and provides a perspective on how feminist and critical pedagogy can frame art librarianship to promote the profession and strengthen its future.

Finding the Material: Collecting and Protecting Intellectual Property in Ephemeral Works of Art
Megan Sallabedra

Abstract—The 1976 Copyright Act outlines the criteria for protecting artists’ original creative work. Where ephemeral, performative works are concerned, the Copyright Act provides no clear guide to direct an institution’s right to display and maintain performance works in its collection. Knowing what the law provides and where the law is limited allows museums to navigate appropriate means of presenting ephemeral works of art. It is essential that collecting institutions work with artists to define material properties of their ephemeral works of art and decide upon appropriate means of display and maintenance for the future.

Planning for Time-Based Media Artwork Preservation at the Philadelphia Museum of Art
Elise Tanner and Margaret Huang

Abstract—The National Digital Stewardship Residency in Art Information (NDSR Art) project at the Philadelphia Museum of Art titled “Planning for Time-Based Media Artwork Preservation” was a year-long initiative to research the collecting, care, and conservation needs of the museum’s time-based media art (TBMA) collection. In this article, the authors describe the work of the NDSR Art resident and her host mentor that entailed establishing digital storage space, creating and implementing a disk-imaging workflow for the artworks’ born-digital components, and developing more robust collection records.  Ultimately, the project produced a foundation of knowledge and documentation to inform museum staff about the best practices and standards necessary to build an infrastructure that fully supports the unique preservation needs of TBMA.  

NDSR Art @ Mia: A Cross-Sector Collaboration in Time-Based Media Art Preservation and Stewardship
Frances Lloyd-Banes, Erin Barsan, Meg Black, and Heidi Raatz

Abstract—In 2017, the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) joined the National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information (NDSR Art) inaugural cohort, hosting a project focused on preservation and stewardship of Mia’s time-based media art, part of the museum’s permanent collections and distinct from its library and archival materials. Post-residency, Mia’s resident and project team members from the museum’s Library & Archives and Collections Information Management departments revisited the project, considering the overlaps and divergences between museum, library, and archival approaches to digital preservation and stewardship. Each offered a unique perspective and reflections on their professional practices.

#Fashionlibrarianship: A Case Study on the Use of Instagram in a Specialized Museum Library Collection
Julie T. Lê 

Abstract—This case study describes the use of Instagram by a fashion librarian at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Irene Lewisohn Costume Reference Library (part of The Costume Institute). In a little over three years, @costumeinstitutelibrary gained over 40,000 followers and has received many accolades from the press. Instagram has been a successful medium for international outreach and advocacy of this specialized museum reference library, as well as an increasingly popular tool for reference inquiries when working with non-academic patrons with backgrounds in creative and fashion-related fields. The author reviews best practices, provides examples on how @costumeinstitutelibrary utilized the latest Instagram features and tools, recommends subscription-based social media analytics metric tools, describes free photo imaging tools used to create a consistent visual feed, and explains the behind-the-scenes workflow for this particular Instagram feed within the context of a museum departmental library.

#artlibraries: Taking the Pulse of Social Media in Art Library Environments
Chantal Sulkow, Jennifer A. Ferretti, William Blueher, and Anna Simon

Abstract—This article presents the results of a survey and three case studies, all of which address questions and issues regarding the use of social media in art library environments. While the authors provide perspectives specifically from academic, museum, and art and design school libraries, their findings will also interest those working in galleries, other types of libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM institutions). The authors discuss crafting an institutional social media presence, methods for evaluating outreach efforts, and approaches for developing policies, guidelines, and strategic goals that ensure a productive use of social media tools. Best practices for increasing awareness and promoting collections are also presented. 

Teaching Social Analysis of Images: A Case Study of Interdepartmental Visual Literacy Instruction in Sociology from the Fine Arts Library
Marianne R. Williams and Anthony Justin Barnum

Abstract—Visual literacy is a set of skills that enable an individual to search, analyze, interact, and create images and media through a critical lens. In preparing post-secondary students for the media-saturated information environment of the twenty-first century, it is important that educators promote visual literacy by encouraging interpretations and discussions of the social, cultural, technological and historical, contexts of images and media. This article offers a brief review of literature regarding pedagogical practice in using the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)’s Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education and a case study of how these skills can be developed for undergraduate students in a 2000-honors-level sociology course taught by a faculty-librarian partnership through the Fine Arts Library at the University of Arkansas.

Unrecognized Creative Labor: A Critique of the George Wittenborn Memorial Book Award
Janelle Rebel

Abstract—As an interwoven case study, this article examines the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) George Wittenborn Memorial Book Award, a hybrid award that celebrates the scholarly achievement, design, and production excellence of art publications.  In the award’s history, however, it has not credited the contributions of graphic designers, typesetters, printers, and other creative laborers. The author examines these omissions by analyzing citation structures and systems of description shared by publishers, booksellers, and libraries, as well as by exposing the invisibilities so often allied to graphic design.  A revision of the Wittenborn Award bibliography is proposed as a retrospective corrective to these oversights. 

Outreach to Support Exhibitions: Creating Bibliographies for the Campus Art Museum
Cara Barker

Abstract—The author describes an outreach project developed between the Western Carolina University fine and performing arts librarian and the campus art museum involving the creation of select bibliographies related to museum exhibitions. The article outlines the initiative and the benefits and challenges of this form of outreach. The author uses examples from the project to explore the potential influence librarians may have on non-departmental campus relationships, library marketing, and collection development.